Tag: preventative

Leptospir-what?

received_2030996850485694So what does this have to do with me and my pets? Leptospirosis is zoonotic meaning that it can be transmitted to humans and other animals!
The most common way that this bacterial disease is passed on is through contaminated water, but it can also be passed through soil, mud and direct contact with an infected animal’s urine.
Nowhere is safe from leptospirosis, there have been cases found all over the world! Most infections take place during rainy periods, but it can still be passed along during dry times.
black-rat-300x212Virtually all mammals can be a carrier of leptospirosis. Some animals can be a carrier, but be asymptotic, meaning they show no signs or symptoms. Others will show signs of fever, depression, vomiting, diarrhea, organ failure, jaundice, and coughing. They do not have to have every symptom to be positive for having leptospirosis.
If you are ever concerned that your pet may have leptospirosis or possibly has been exposed to it, please contact your veterinarian. There are blood and urine tests that can be done to test for the infection.

Leptospirosis can be treated once it is detected, but the earlier it is caught the better chance of survival. The pet will typically be placed on IV fluids to help support kidney function, started on antibiotics, and treated for the symptoms that the pet is showing at that time.

 hypokalemia

Prevention is key! There is a vaccine available to prevent the leptospirosis disease. The vaccine can be started as early as 12 weeks of age. It will need to be boostered once in 3-4 weeks after the initial vaccine. After that, it is updated annually.
received_2030996927152353Whether your dog goes camping every weekend or is a stay-at-home pup, we  recommend that every dog is vaccinated, regardless of their lifestyle. Just because your dog stays in the yard doesn’t mean he isn’t at risk. Remember, leptospirosis can be carried by a variety of animals, most of which you can find in your own back yard!
Big or small it, can effect them all!!
By: Leslie Amaral
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Feline Heartworm Disease

cat-confusedWhile cats are not natural hosts for heartworms, they are still at risk for contracting them. Just like with dogs, heartworms are contracted through mosquito bites. As we’ve mentioned before, we’re in prime mosquito territory. In areas that have mosquitoes, an incidence of 2-14% exist in cats.

Feline Heartworm Disease causes severe lung disease, heart failure, along with damage to other organs. Adult heartworms can grow to be 12 inches long. Cats will typically only have 1-3 adult worms, but they can have up to 6. It only takes 1-3 adult heartworms to cause the cat to collapse and die.

mosquito-illustration_2092x1660Cats are not natural hosts for heartworms. Their immune system is very reactive against heartworms and this makes it next to impossible to detect microfilaria in an infected cat. Microfilaria is the off-spring of adult heartworms born in the host body and found in the blood stream. If a mosquito bites a dog that has microfilaria in their blood stream, they become infected. The mosquito can then transfer the microfilaria to any cats or dogs that they bite next.

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The tests currently available detect an antigen that is given off by mature female heartworms. It takes heartworms 6 months to mature. This is why with dogs, we recommend doing a heartworm test once they’re at least 6 months of age and repeating test in 6 months if there was a lapse in prevention. However with cats, due to the limited number of heartworms that grow to maturity, they can be difficult to detect with these tests.

While heartworms can be treated in dogs, the medication used (Immiticide) is toxic to cats. Unfortunately at this time, there are no treatments available for heartworm positive cats.

revHowever, there is good news! The disease is 100% preventable. Our recommendation is Revolution. Revolution prevents fleas, roundworms, hookworms and ear mites as well as heartworms. Revolution is a topical preventative instead of an oral, making it easier to administer.  If you apply once every 30 days, your cat will not only be flea-free, but they’ll also be protected against heartworms!

Twelve common symptoms of Feline Heartworm Disease are:5625pt1

  1. Coughing
  2. Weight Loss
  3. Lethargy
  4. Gagging
  5. Vomiting
  6. Collapsing
  7. Lack of Appetite
  8. Abnormal Rapid Breathing (Tachypnea)
  9. Difficulty Breathing
  10. Blindness
  11. Convulsions
  12. Sudden Death

Remember – Mosquitos are everywhere! Just because your cat is strictly indoors only doesn’t mean that they aren’t at risk. Every pet should be on both flea and heartworm preventatives year round.

By: Candace Ivey

Concerned about your canine companion? Read about Double Defense here to learn more about heartworms in dogs & the best way to prevent your pup from them.