Tag: environmental factors

There’s a Fungus Among Us!

Ringworm is a fairly common and highly contagious skin, nail, and hair or fur infection that despite its name does not always manifest as a ring and is NOT caused by a worm! Ringworm is actually caused by a fungus! There are several different types of fungi that are responsible for ringworm infections and many of them are zoonotic, meaning the infection can be transmitted to and from both humans and pets. The infection is easily spread by skin to skin contact and from objects or surfaces that have been touched by an infected person or pet such as clothing, towels or bedding, and brushes or combs. The fungi also occur in soil.

So what does a ringworm infection look like?

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Symptoms of Ringworm in Pets

Ringworm is not a life-threatening disease, but it is very contagious and does require the intervention of a veterinarian. Knowing the symptoms of ringworm can help you catch the disease before it passes to humans or other pets.

ringworm3aRingworm usually presents as circular areas of hair loss throughout the body. These lesions may start to heal in the center as they enlarge, creating a patchy appearance, and may become inflamed or scabbed.

Ringworm usually does not itch. The affected hair follicles are brittle and break easily, which helps spread the disease throughout your home. In some cases the fungus infects the claws, making them brittle and rough.

Contact your veterinarian if your dog or cat experiences any or all of these symptoms:ringworm3

  • Circular areas of hair loss
  • Dry, brittle hair
  • Scabby, inflamed skin
  • Rough, brittle claws

How is Ringworm diagnosed?

Often your veterinarian can determine from the symptoms your pets has that it is a ringworm infection. There is also a special type of ultraviolet lamp called a Woods Lamp that can be used. Some types of ringworm fungi will fluoresce when exposed to this light.

Unfortunately, not all ringworm infections will fluoresce. Your veterinarian may need to set up a culture to determine the best course of treatment.

How is ringworm treated?

Your veterinarian will determine the best course of treatment. The most common way to treat ringworm is to use a combination of topical therapy (application of creams, ointments or shampoos) and systemic oral therapy (administration of anti-fungal drugs by mouth). In order for treatment to be successful, all environmental contamination must be eliminated.  All surfaces must be cleaned and all bedding should be washed. Humans should be diligent about washing hands frequently and thoroughly. If you suspect you have ringworm you should see your doctor. The earlier the infection can be diagnosed the more the chance of spreading the infection decreases.

By: Kathy Berrier

A Whole New Meaning to “Take My Breath Away”

Imagine not being able to breathe because your windpipe is falling in on itself!aa

This is a real condition called “Tracheal Collapse” where the trachea (windpipe) collapses during breathing. Typically seen in smaller breeds as they get older, tracheal collapse is an irreversible condition that affects the ability to breathe easily.

The trachea is a like a hose – it’s thin and flexible with small cartilaginous rings to help hold the airway open. In some cases of tracheal collapse, the cartilage in the rings become weak and lose their flexibility, causing the airway to fall flat. This doesn’t allow passage of air into or out of the windpipe, triggering an episode of coughing or gasping.

Who’s Most At Risk?
Smaller breeds such as Yorkshire terriers, Pomeranians, Poodles and Chihuahuas are at a higher risk. Even dogs that are overweight or even live in household with smokers can be at risk for developing this condition.

abWhat Does It Sound/Look Like?
A pet affected by this disorder could develop a harsh cough that sounds like something is stuck in their throat or even a honking sound. This could happen after being picked up, periods of activity or when their collar is pulled. Overall, the pet will have difficulty breathing and their tongue may turn blue/purple when excited or after an episode of tracheal collapse.

How Do I Know If My Dog Has It?
Calling your clinic to set up an appointment with your veterinarian is a great first step. At the appointment, your veterinarian may discuss how long it’s been going on, what the cough/difficulty breathing sounds like. Your veterinarian may recommend diagnostic testing such as a general blood profile and x-rays of the chest. In more severe cases, your vet may recommend a referral to a specialist where they can do more specific diagnostic testing like a an endoscopy, where the inside of the pet’s throat may be clearly viewed with a fiber optic camera or an echocardiogram to evaluate the heart function.

How Do I Treat This Condition?
While the condition is irreversible, your pet can still have a great life! After diagnosis, your veterinarian may recommend weight loss if your pet is overweight, medications to help reduce spasms or irritation of the airway or mild sedatives you can give at home to help reduce coughing fits. Your pet may benefit from a harness as opposed to a collar that can put stress on the neck and trigger a tracheal collapse episode. Dogs should be kept away from smoke or other environmental pollutions. Additionally, your pet could develop a secondary infection that may need to be treated with antibiotics at the discretion of your doctor.ac

Treatment with medication works for most dogs, however the medical management may be life-long. In most severe cases, a specialist can perform surgery by placing plastic rings around the outside of the trachea or a stent, which helps to hold the trachea open.

By: Madison Cole

Sources:
https://www.acvs.org/small-animal/tracheal-collapse
http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/what-you-need-to-know-about-collapsing-tracheas-in-dogs
https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/tracheal-collapse-in-dogs

Itchy Itchy Scratchy Scratchy – Can you get my Backey?

We all hate allergy season sneezing watery eyes and headaches. Luckily there are medications that relieve us from these symptoms, but did you know that your dogs can get allergies too? Dogs can experience skin luhf,allergies due to the pollen and other substances in the air. Dogs can also experience a chronic inflammatory skin condition called atopic dermatitis that could need lifelong management; in fact 10% of dogs have some kind of atopic dermatitis. Whether it is seasonal allergies or a chronic condition, dogs’ instinct will have them licking, scratching, and chewing at their skin to relieve the itch. This can cause hair loss and major irritation to the skin which can result in skin infections. But don’t worry – relief is just a short drive to your neighborhood veterinarian clinic!

There are medications similar to humans’ Claritin and Zyrtec, that are given orally on a daily basis. But what if those don’t help or your dog doesn’t like to take pills? Another option? Cytopoint, an injection that can relieve itch for 4-8 weeks. Cytopoint is a protein based (not chemical) medication that works similar to the cytodog’s immune system. When the “itching” signal is sent by your dog’s body to the brain it causes the reaction to start scratching or chewing. Cytopoint intercepts that signal to prevent your pet from scratching and allowing their skin to heal working similar to antibodies in their immune system. Because Cytopoint is not a chemical medication dogs’ bodies are able to break it down naturally. Meaning it does not get eliminated through the liver and kidney so no harm can be done to your pets’ organs. This makes it safe for dogs of all ages and can be used alongside other medications your pup may be taking.

self-control-charts

If you and your veterinarian decide Cytopoint injections are the best option for your furry friend, they can began feeling relief within 1 day and damaged skin can begin to heal within 7 days. After the first injection your vet may want to see your dog in 4 weeks to see the progress of the Cytopoint after which the two of you can discuss how often your dog may need an injection. The idea is to extend the time between shots and get your dog longer relief.  Your veterinarian will help you recognize signs that it is time for your pup to get their next injection. Another helpful tool is the itch tracker located on the Cytopoint website (https://www.cytopoint4dogs.com/resources.aspx), this chart can help you determine when it is time to bring your pet in for the next injection.

If you think your dog has allergies or an atopic dermatitis, set up an appointment with your veterinarian and ask about using Cytopoint. Start the journey to a longer itch free lifestyle because both you and your dog deserve relief from allergies!

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By: Deanna Smith