Tag: direct contact

“Two Dogs Walk Into A Kennel…”

kennelcough1Canine Infectious Tracheobronchitis, better known as “Kennel Cough”, is a contagious respiratory disease that is commonly transmitted in places like boarding and grooming facilities. Dogs spread this disease via oral transmission such as airborne droplets (from a cough), direct contact, or contaminated surfaces (water bowls, floors). Kennel cough can be treated easily, however in dogs younger than 6 months and immunocompromised dogs, it poses a more serious risk.

Symptoms present as: a strong cough (“honking” sound), runny nose, sneezing, lethargy, loss of appetite and sometimes fever. Mild cases can be treated with a course of antibiotics and a serious prescription for rest and relaxation. Cough suppressants may also be prescribed to ease any throat pain that can occur.

kennelcough2
Image: Bordetella bacterium

The bordetella vaccine is something that your veterinarian will recommend as a part of their “core vaccines” along with rabies and DHPP (distemper/hepatitis/parvovirus/parainfluenza).

The vaccine is available in oral, nasal and injectable forms and is typically given twice – once and then boostered in about 2-4 weeks. Afterwards, the vaccine is re-administered every 6 months. While the bordetella vaccine will not prevent against kennel cough, it will certainly ease the symptoms if your pet is infected.

Because the disease is so highly contagious, most grooming and boarding facilities will require that your pet be vaccinated against this before coming to their facility. Ultimately, you should consult your veterinarian about frequency of administration and if your dog is at risk. This vaccine isn’t just for little Fluffy who gets a haircut every couple weeks, we also recommend it for Fido who just goes outside for walks.

Further information can be found through your veterinarian but also online at:

  1. https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/health/kennel-cough-symptoms-treatment-and-prevention/
  2. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/common-dog-diseases

By: Madison Cole

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