Tag: cbc

Hyperadrenocorticism? Is that even a real word?

What is it?

Hyperadrenocorticism (more commonly known as Cushing’s disease) is an overproduction of cortisol hormone. At normal levels, cortisol helps in response to stress and regulate the immune system. Cushing’s disease is one of the most common endocrine diseases in dogs.

Some common symptoms include:

  • Increased thirstcushings2
  • Increased urination
  • Increased hunger
  • Increased panting
  • Distended abdomen
  • Obesity
  • Loss of hair
  • Muscle weakness and loss
  • Darkening of skin
  • Lack of energy
  • Increased Urine Cortisol:Creatinine Ratios

Not all symptoms are present in every patient and some of these symptoms can also be seen with other diseases. Only your veterinarian can diagnose if your pet has Cushing’s.

There are multiple causes:cushings1

  • Excessive administration of corticosteroid medications.
  • Benign pituitary tumor (rarely can be malignant).
  • Adrenal gland tumor (adrenal-dependent hyperadrenocorticism/ADH).
  • Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) – the body naturally produces too much hormone.

Diagnosis

Your pet’s veterinarian will first take a detailed history and do a complete physical exam. Next step is to perform a full blood chemistry, complete blood count, and urinalysis. These diagnostics will help the veterinarian get a bigger picture of what is happening in the body. Further testing that can help diagnose specific causes include: urine cortisol/creatinine ratio then ACTH stimulation test or Dexamethasone suppression test. The stimulation and suppression tests help determine specifically how much cortisol is being produced and how best it should be treated.

Treatment

  • Excessive administration of corticosteroid medications: Treatment is to slowly wean off the medications according to your veterinarian’s instructions.
  • Benign pituitary tumor and Adrenal gland tumor: First, a metastases check is performed to make sure the tumor has not spread to other organs. Then, a medication is given called trilostane (Vetoryl) to shrink the tumor. Once the tumor has decreased in size, it is removed.
  • Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism: The pet is put on trilostane for life. This controls the production of cortisol.

Living with Cushing’s Disease

This is a serious disease, but it can be managed if pet owners and veterinarians work together. This is a lifelong diagnosis and does require medications to be given long term. Periodic monitoring will be required to make sure the treatment is going as it should and to help the veterinarians know if an adjustment needs to be made.

cushings3

Sources:
Common Diseases of Companion Animals By Alleice Summers
Google images

By: Jamie McAfee

Early Detection- Why Diagnostic Tests are Important for Your Pet(s)

By Tara Sansing

Did you know?

  • If detected early, 75% of common diseases in dogs and 63% of common diseases in cats can be prevented by dietary modifications alone over a one year period.
  • Kidney disease is one of the major causes of illness and death in dogs and cats, but symptoms do not usually appear until 2/3 of kidney function has been lost. If caught early, the animal can live with condition for many years.
  • If a liver problem is detected at an early stage of the disease and is administered proper treatment, the chance of your pet’s recovery is in your favor.
  • Early detection of diabetes is extremely important because an early therapy regimen can be more effective and easier on the animal. Detecting and monitoring diabetes early can also prevent damage to other organs.

Our pets can’t talk and often seem perfectly fine when something is wrong. So how do you know when there is a problem? The answer is early detection.

Early detection is not one test, a series of tests, or just one visit. It is a new way of caring for your pet, just like human medicine allows us to care for ourselves. Medical advancements enable us to diagnose potential diseases before they become a serious issue including heartworm, thyroid disease and intestinal parasites in our pets.

While a physical examination is vital to your pet’s healthcare, there are several conditions that cannot be diagnosed by simply looking, listening and touching. Chemistry and hematology blood tests provide a detailed look at your pet’s health from the inside. Since our pets age almost seven times faster than we do, we recommend that these tests be performed annually.

Here is a breakdown of critical diagnostic tests we recommend to ensure that your pet is as healthy on the inside as he or she appears to be on the outside.

Fecal Exam
We check your pet’s stool once a year for signs of intestinal disease and parasites. We will examine the stool for outward signs of disease such as blood, mucous and abnormal consistency. We’ll also send a sample of your pet’s stool to the lab so that they can test it for the presence of parasites including hookworms, roundworms, whipworms, coccidia and giardia.

Heartworm Test
Each year, we draw a few drops of your pet’s blood so that it can be tested for heartworms. The test can be run in the clinic and only takes 10 minutes to process which means that you can get results right away! Heartworms can be fatal in both cats and dogs and are spread by infected mosquitoes. Even pets that stay indoors are at risk because mosquitoes often slip into the house and can infect unprotected pets. It is important to perform this test annually even if your dog or cat is on heartworm prevention year-round as even one missed dose or late dose of preventative can put them at risk.

Serum Chemistry Panel and Complete Blood Count (CBC)
It is important to perform this test annually to detect and prevent disease as early as possible. These blood tests can tell us if your pet is anemic, fighting infection and whether or not their internal organs are functioning properly. In some cases, treatable diseases such as diabetes can be detected with these tests.

Urinalysis
Like a blood test, a urinalysis can give us an understanding of what is happening on the inside of your pet. A urinalysis once a year can help us to diagnose underlying diseases such as bladder infections, diabetes and renal failure.

These tests will help your pet live a long, healthy life but staying on top of internal disease. Once we have the results of these tests, we will have a better picture of your pet’s internal pet health and we will be well on our way to detecting disease as early as possible.