Tag: boarding

Wellness for All Ages

“Until one has loved an animal a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.” -Anatole France

Senior Wellness

At TLC, we recognize that no two animals are the same. We respect their individuality and their

individual needs throughout all stages of their lives. Unfortunately, aging is a fact of life and can take its toll on the body. That’s why we specialize in senior wellness and care. We monitor senior pets closely for age related changes so that we can address developing medical conditions as soon as possible.

We work with you to create and customize a care plan for your pets as they age so that they can remain happy and comfortable in their later years and so that you can spend as many years with them as possible.

Some of the services that we offer and recommend for our senior patients include:

Extensive Bi-Annual Examinations

Pets age at seven times the rate of humans. It is for this reason that we recommend bi-annual examinations for all of our senior patients. The Doctor will check your pet from nose to toes looking for any physical changes that need to be addressed or monitored. This includes monitoring their weight, listening to the heart and lungs, checking their eyes and ears, palpating their abdomen and checking the joints for stiffness or discomfort.

Bloodwork & Urinalysis

While a physical examination is vital to your pet’s healthcare, there are several conditions that simply cannot be diagnosed by just looking, listening, and touching. Chemistry and hematology blood tests and urinalysis provide a detailed look at your pet’s health from the inside.

Radiographs

As pets age they experience many changes internally such as changes in their organs and joints. Radiographs give us a better picture of what is happening inside the body and allow us to address and monitor these changes. All radiographs are reviewed by board certified radiologists who can help identify and diagnose these changes and make additional recommendations for care.

Blood Pressures

Just like humans, dogs and cats can also suffer from high blood pressure, especially as they get older. Hypertension in pets is often caused by some other underlying disease and thus is a very important wellness screening tool. All senior pets should have a screening blood pressure with every exam.

Ocular Pressures

Glaucoma is a serious condition where the pressure of the eye becomes elevated. It can be extremely painful for dogs and cats and can cause irreversible, rapid blindness. It may not be obvious to pet owners when they eye is only mildly affected so it is recommended that screening pressures be performed twice a year. Medications, when administered regularly, can help to lower eye pressure and slow down vision loss.

Schirmer Tear Tests

As dogs age, they frequently develop a condition called KCS or dry eye. Many breeds such as Shih-Tzus, Pugs and Boston Terriers are pre-disposed to this condition. It can be painful and lead to other damages to the eyes if left untreated. Schirmer Tear Tests allow us to monitor the eyes’ ability to produce tears. Medications can be prescribed if needed to ensure that your pets’ eyes stay properly lubricated.

Laser Therapy

Our Class III Therapeutic Cold Laser is specifically designed to treat pain and inflammation due to arthritis. Low level laser light has both anti-inflammatory and immunostimulate effects. Following a laser session approximately 75-80% of clients that have patients being treated notice improvement in their condition.

Medication Therapy

There are many pet-safe medications available to relieve arthritic discomfort and pain. These medications have been tested for long term use in pets. We can recommend and prescribe these medications based on your pets’ personalized wellness plan.

Geriatric Boarding

As pets age, many require care beyond basic boarding. That’s why we offer Geriatric Boarding for our senior patients. This service is available for pets that are physically restricted and/or have medical conditions that make it difficult for them to stay at general boarding facilities. Our team is specially trained to deliver exceptional care to senior pets including monitoring them closely while here and administering their medications. All senior boarders are walked every hour and we provide hygienic baths as needed to make sure that they remain clean and comfortable.  You can have confidence that your pets’ are receiving the care that they need while you are away.

In addition to beds and mats, we also provide Pet Cots for our boarders. Unlike regular bedding which has been known to clump and become uneven, Pet Cots evenly distribute a pet’s weight and relieve stress on the joints. The raised design protects pets from excessive cold, heat & moisture and yet is low enough to the ground to allow older pets to climb step easily on and off the cot.

Products
In addition to providing senior specific services, we carry a variety of products that address age related changes including:

  • Purina Neuro-Care, a diet designed to promote healthy brain activity and joints in aging dogs
  • Hills J/D, high levels of glucosamine and fatty acids promote healthy joints
  • Therapeutic Diets for medical conditions such as renal disease
  • Planet Dog “Old Soul” Balls  Senior dogs are only as old as the wag of their tail. The Old Soul Ball is designed to address the issues dogs experience as they grow older and wiser: reduced vision and snout strength, weakened jaw muscles, and brittle teeth. High contrast colors make the Old Soul Ball easy to spot, and the extra mint makes it easier to sniff out. The material is given extra pliability to offer a satisfying chew that’s easy on the gums and snout

By: Tara Sansing

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It’s been a bad flu season… for dogs!

By: Tara Sansing

As you have most likely already seen via the news there have been recent outbreaks of the flu in dogs across the country. At least two positive cases have been confirmed in the Houston area in the last couple of weeks.

Please be aware that this is the second strain of dog-flu-symptomsinfluenza that has been known to affect dogs. In the past, we have seen outbreaks of the Canine Influenza Virus (CIV) otherwise known as the H3N8 strain. The current flu virus, H3N2, emerged in Asia in 2005 and spread to the United States in 2015. Since then, there have been scattered positive cases in dogs across the country and more recently large outbreaks in several states.

Just like the H3N8 flu virus, H3N2 is an upper respiratory virus. The most common symptoms are coughing, fever, nasal discharge, lethargy and lack of appetite. Dogs are contagious for 5-7 days prior to showing the first symptoms and it is for this reason that H3N2 has spread very quickly. Because the virus is relatively new, dogs have no natural immunity against the virus—if unvaccinated and exposed, the chances of being infected is close to 100%.

The significance of an influenza infection is that it compromises the normal defense mechanisms of the canine respiratory tract so that secondary bacterial infections, including pneumonia, are common. The mortality rate for the virus and resulting infections is 8%. The dogs most at risk of dying are very old, young or are immune compromised because of another condition. Breeds such as Bulldogs, Boston terriers, German shepherds, etc. are more susceptible to secondary lung infection.

Who should be vaccinated?

Any dogs that walk in the neighborhood, visit with neighbor dogs through the fence, get dogs-playing-dog_parkbathed/groomed, board, go to training classes or play at the dog park are at high risk.  It is important to understand, however, that a dog does not have to come in direct contact with a dog that has the virus. The virus can live in the environment for several days and so any dogs that are in the same area later are also at risk.  The H3N2 virus can also be brought home by any person that has come into contact with the virus.

Please note that much like the flu vaccine in humans, the vaccine does not guarantee that a dog will not contract the virus but the symptoms will be much less severe and the dog should recover more quickly.  Any dog that has not received the vaccine in the past will need an initial vaccine followed by a booster in 2-4 weeks. The H3N2 vaccine should continue to be administered annually along with the H3N8 vaccine.

Starting July 1st, all dogs that drop off for baths and boarding at our clinic will need be vaccinated for both strains of influenza. This is for the safety of all patients in our care.

If you have any questions or would like to schedule a time for your pup(s) to come in for the vaccine, please contact the clinic at 281-282-9944.

Canine Influenza

-By Tara Sansing

As many of us have probably already seen via news reports, there have been recent outbreaks of the Canine Influenza Virus in some states. These reports have been leaving many pet owners with more questions rather than answers….

What is the Canine Influenza Virus? & What do these recent outbreaks mean for me and my dog(s)?

Canine Influenza (CIV) was first discovered in 2004 when a pack of greyhounds at a racetrack in Florida became very ill and several dogs died.  What scientists discovered was that these dogs had been racing at horse tracks and that a strain of influenza that had been found in horses for decades had mutated and was now infecting the dogs.

CIV is an upper respiratory virus. The most common symptoms are coughing, fever, nasal discharge, lethargy and lack of appetite. The significance of a CIV infection is that it compromises the normal defense mechanisms of the canine respiratory tract so that secondary bacterial infections, including pneumonia, are common. The mortality rate for the virus and resulting infections is 8%.

How does it spread?  

  • Through direct contact between dogs (licking & nuzzling)
  • Through the air (coughing, sneezing)
  • Via contaminated surfaces (such as a shared toy or when a person picks up the virus on their hands, then pets a dog)

    The Canine Influenza Virus can be spread from dog to dog or via contaminate surfaces.
    The Canine Influenza Virus can be spread from dog to dog or via contaminate surfaces.

Any dogs that walk in the neighborhood, visit with neighbor dogs through the fence, get bathed/groomed, board, go to training classes or play at the dog park are at high risk.  It is important to understand, however, that a dog does not have to come in direct contact with a dog that has the virus. CIV can live in the environment for several days and so any dogs that are in the same area later are also at risk.  CIV can also be brought home by any person that has come into contact with the virus.

Dogs are contagious for 5-7 days prior to showing the first symptoms and it is for this reason that CIV has spread very quickly.  Since those initial reports in 2004, there have been positive cases in 39 states. Because the virus is relatively new, dogs have no natural immunity against the virus—if unvaccinated and exposed, the chances of being infected is close to 100%

As a precaution against outbreak, we are recommending that all dogs be vaccinated for the canine influenza virus. In addition, the vaccine will be required for all boarders, day boarders and baths. Please note that much like the flu vaccine in humans, the vaccine does not guarantee that your dog will not contract the virus but the symptoms will be much less severe and the dog should recover more quickly.  Any dog that has not received the vaccine in the past will need an initial vaccine followed by a booster in 2-4 weeks. The vaccine should continue to be given annually.

If you have any questions, or would like to schedule an appointment to bring your dog(s) in for the vaccine,  please contact the clinic at 281-282-9944.

Stress Reduction Through Synthetic Pheromone Therapy

By Erin Fitzpatrick-Wacker

All pets can experience some form of stress throughout their lives. Luckily for cats and dogs, there are some veterinary alternatives available to help ease their stress.

For cats, there are 3 options available: Feliway Diffuser (covers 750 sq. ft. for continuous coverage for one month), Feliway Spray (spray areas for direct coverage 10 minutes before needed), and Meridian Collar (high pheromone concentration that travels with patient and lasts 30 days).

Is your cat scared of unfamiliar situations or sounds, worried during travel, scared or nervous while riding in the car, anxious during grooming or boarding, scared of new furniture or a new home environment, afraid of a new pet in the household or maintaining multi-cat households, damaging or scratching furniture or walls, afraid of meeting new people or new babies, scared during veterinary visits or hospitalization visits, or inappropriately marking areas with urine? If your cat falls into any of these categories, Feliway or Meridian might be a good choice to help adapt to these challenging situations.

Feliway is a synthetic pheromone that mimics the facial pheromone produced when a cat rubs its face on an object to scent mark. Meridian is a synthetic pheromone that mimics the pheromones mother cats produce to reassure kittens. The calming pheromones reduce the alarming sense cats can feel during stressful situations and help control those unwanted behaviors that stem from stress. Your cat doesn’t have to be showing symptoms of stress to enjoy the benefits of stress reduction that these products can offer.

Feliway studies show that it reduces house soiling by 57%. Be sure to contact your veterinarian about improper urine marking, since this could be a sign of something besides stress.

For dogs, there are 3 options avaiable: Adaptil Diffuser (covers 750 sq. ft. for continuous coverage for one month), Adaptil Spray (spray areas for direct coverage 10 minutes before needed), and Adaptil Collar (high pheromone concentration that travels with patient and lasts 30 days).

Is your dog one to hide from loud noises (fireworks), afraid of meeting new people or going to a new place, destructive when left alone, scared or nervous while riding in the car, afraid or noisy during the night, anxious during veterinary visits, unsettled during puppy training classes, anxious during grooming or boarding, scared of a new leash or the crate, or stressed during any new situation? If you dog falls into any of these categories, Adaptil might be a good choice to help adapt to these challenging situations.

Stress can be the main cause of destructive behaviors, fearful behaviors (barking, cowering, biting), or even house soiling. Studies show that it is essential to minimize stress in the first year of puppy growth to optimize their growth and socialization potential.
Adaptil studies show that it reduces excessive barking by 70%, reduces destructive behavior by 86%, reduces house soiling by 67%, and reduces night time troubles for new puppies for 68%.

Sometimes Adaptil, Feliway, and Meridian alone aren’t enough to help ease the stressful situations that life places in our path. If that is the case, contact your veterinarian for alternative and additional choices.