Category: Labwork

MDR… What?!..

Congratulations! You’ve just adopted a new family member! They are cute, furry and already an important part of your life! Naturally you want them to be as healthy as possible. You’ve been to the vet and you’ve talked about vaccines, microchips and spaying / neutering. But what about the MDR1 gene? Has your dog been tested? If not, you will definitely want to discuss this with the Doctor—especially if your dog is one of the affected herding or hound breeds, as it can cause life-threatening complications.

What is MDR1?

Many herding breed dogs have a genetic predisposition to adverse drug reactions involving over a dozen different drugs. Scientists discovered that these dogs lack a protein (P-Glycoprotein), which is responsible for pumping out many drugs and toxins from the brain, and that affected dogs show signs of toxicity because they are unable to stop drugs from permeating their brains. Researchers have identified that this condition is due to a mutation in the multi-drug resistance gene [MDR1].

In the grand scheme of things, the mutation wouldn’t be a problem at all except for the use of certain therapeutic drugs in veterinary medicine. While these drugs are very beneficial for most dogs, they can be dangerous and even lethal to those with the MDR1 mutation. Affected dogs, when treated with certain common drugs such as Ivermectin and loperamide (Imodium), are unable to pump out these drugs from the brain resulting in poisoning and neurologic symptoms ranging from tremors, anorexia and excess salivation to blindness, coma and even death.

How do I test my dog for the MDR1 Mutation?

Testing for the MDR1 Mutation is simple and non-invasive! All it takes is scheduling time for a technician to draw a blood sample from your dog. The blood can either be sent to Washing State University for testing for the MDR1 Gene or sent to the lab for a full Genetic Health Analysis which identifies both ancestry information and scans for multiple genetic disorders including the MDR1 mutation.

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During January, all Genetic Health Analysis tests are 10% OFF

If you have any questions or would like schedule a time for your dog to come in for testing, contact the clinic at 281-282-9944.

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Discover the Secrets of Your Dog’s DNA

mixed-breeds

Have you ever looked at your pup and wondered where they really came from? Are they really part Lab like the shelter predicted? Or are they a German Shepherd mix?

We can help you answer those questions with Royal Canin’s DNA & Genetic Health Analysis!

What makes this test better than a standard breed test?

The test not only identifies your dog’s ancestry information (going back to great-grandparents) but also tests for several inheritable genetic diseases based on their breed composition.

Why is this important?

Genetic testing in dogs enables diagnosis of a disease before the development of its first symptoms. Results of genetic tests are accurate and more reliable than conventional methods for disease detection, especially in case of late onset diseases. DNA tests also enable diagnosis of the disease before reaching mating age, thus allowing prevention of the disease-causing mutation from being transmitted to offspring.

Genetic testing in dogs is the only way of revealing carriers for a disease with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. This is the factor that makes DNA tests a valuable weapon in the fight against inherited diseases in dogs, especially since autosomal recessive diseases are the most common.

The Royal Canin DNA Genetic Health Analysis tests for more than 130 genetic mutations including the MDR1 Drug Sensitivity Gene and Cardiac Diseases. Knowing this information about your dog is invaluable and allows us to create a customized health plan that reflects your dog’s individual genetic code and needs.

Dogs can be genetically tested at any age and there is no need for repeated testing which makes genetic tests economically valuable. It should be noted that the test is non-invasive; a simple technician appointment for a blood draw is sufficient for performing a DNA test.

 During December and January, All Genetic Health Tests are 10% OFF!

 For more information or to schedule a time for your pet to come in, please contact the clinic at 281-282-9944.

 

Changes In Underweight And Overweight Cats

By- Erin Fitzpatrick-Wacker

Is your cat experiencing changes in its normal habits? Since our cats can’t tell us what is bothering them, we monitor their everyday behavior for changes to alert us that something may have changed.

In the case of diabetes, some early symptoms you might see are attacking you for food, inappropriate elimination, problems jumping on things, and worn off fur on the bottom of paws. Some late symptoms you might see are increased water consumption and increased urination.

In the case of hyperthyroidism, you might see increased appetite, changes in their coat, and weight loss.

If we are checking their lab work regularly, we are able to monitor many of these changes, and in the case of early diabetes, can even reverse the changes if caught early enough. We recommend screening lab work for every overweight and underweight cat, especially if they are over 10 years old, and every cat over the age of 7, especially if they are being anesthetized. 50% of diabetic and hyperthyroid cats have an underlying gastrointestinal issue (GI) and need additional screening lab, such as a GI panel with their regular lab work. Diabetic patients are also prone to urinary tract infections and require additional testing for their urine.

Properly diagnosed cats with gastrointestinal problems live 2 years longer, since skinny old cats have a reduced ability to digest fats and proteins, which is why we prescribe the special diet we put them on.

We also often like to check the quality of their stool to check and document consistency. Many cats with gastrointestinal problems have normal looking stool from the outside, but the inside will be waxy or liquid-like.

Monitor your cat closely for changes because of the special needs of senior pets and do yearly screening lab work to help evalutate their internal organs and identify underlying medical conditions. The sooner we identify their condition, the faster we can treat it. Bring these noticeable changes to the attention of your veterinarian for proper testing and diagnosis.

Early Detection- Why Diagnostic Tests are Important for Your Pet(s)

By Tara Sansing

Did you know?

  • If detected early, 75% of common diseases in dogs and 63% of common diseases in cats can be prevented by dietary modifications alone over a one year period.
  • Kidney disease is one of the major causes of illness and death in dogs and cats, but symptoms do not usually appear until 2/3 of kidney function has been lost. If caught early, the animal can live with condition for many years.
  • If a liver problem is detected at an early stage of the disease and is administered proper treatment, the chance of your pet’s recovery is in your favor.
  • Early detection of diabetes is extremely important because an early therapy regimen can be more effective and easier on the animal. Detecting and monitoring diabetes early can also prevent damage to other organs.

Our pets can’t talk and often seem perfectly fine when something is wrong. So how do you know when there is a problem? The answer is early detection.

Early detection is not one test, a series of tests, or just one visit. It is a new way of caring for your pet, just like human medicine allows us to care for ourselves. Medical advancements enable us to diagnose potential diseases before they become a serious issue including heartworm, thyroid disease and intestinal parasites in our pets.

While a physical examination is vital to your pet’s healthcare, there are several conditions that cannot be diagnosed by simply looking, listening and touching. Chemistry and hematology blood tests provide a detailed look at your pet’s health from the inside. Since our pets age almost seven times faster than we do, we recommend that these tests be performed annually.

Here is a breakdown of critical diagnostic tests we recommend to ensure that your pet is as healthy on the inside as he or she appears to be on the outside.

Fecal Exam
We check your pet’s stool once a year for signs of intestinal disease and parasites. We will examine the stool for outward signs of disease such as blood, mucous and abnormal consistency. We’ll also send a sample of your pet’s stool to the lab so that they can test it for the presence of parasites including hookworms, roundworms, whipworms, coccidia and giardia.

Heartworm Test
Each year, we draw a few drops of your pet’s blood so that it can be tested for heartworms. The test can be run in the clinic and only takes 10 minutes to process which means that you can get results right away! Heartworms can be fatal in both cats and dogs and are spread by infected mosquitoes. Even pets that stay indoors are at risk because mosquitoes often slip into the house and can infect unprotected pets. It is important to perform this test annually even if your dog or cat is on heartworm prevention year-round as even one missed dose or late dose of preventative can put them at risk.

Serum Chemistry Panel and Complete Blood Count (CBC)
It is important to perform this test annually to detect and prevent disease as early as possible. These blood tests can tell us if your pet is anemic, fighting infection and whether or not their internal organs are functioning properly. In some cases, treatable diseases such as diabetes can be detected with these tests.

Urinalysis
Like a blood test, a urinalysis can give us an understanding of what is happening on the inside of your pet. A urinalysis once a year can help us to diagnose underlying diseases such as bladder infections, diabetes and renal failure.

These tests will help your pet live a long, healthy life but staying on top of internal disease. Once we have the results of these tests, we will have a better picture of your pet’s internal pet health and we will be well on our way to detecting disease as early as possible.