Category: Holidays

Spring into Easter & Keep Your Pets Safe this Holiday

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Spring has finally sprung! The sun is out, the flowers are blooming, and Peter Cottontail is on his way! Easter is right around the corner and this year is extra special because we get two holidays in one as Easter falls on April 1st this year allowing us to celebrate tricks and treats in one day but wait isn’t that another holiday? Well we get two rounds of it in 2018 which also means we get double the toil & trouble with our pets this year, wait…. Back to Spring, we often get so caught up in our excitement for Easter and warm weather that we forget about the hazards some objects bring to our cats and dogs during these celebrations. So, here’s just a quick reminder of things that could cause potential harm to your beloved fur-family!

The most common thing that people are aware of when it comes to holidays and your pets is chocolate, yes chocolate is toxic not only to dogs but to cats as well. Theobromine is the chemical ingredient in cocoa that animals are toxic to and the toxicity of chocolate is based off of the amount of theobromine in the chocolate and the weight of the animal. Anything over 45mg is considered toxic and possibly lethal to dogs however every situation is different, different chocolates vs different types/weight of canines can result in different outcomes. The best way to keep your pup safe is to be able to access the situation if your dog has consumed chocolate and what signs to recognize if your clever canine hid the evidence of eating that delicious bunny that went missing from the basket.

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First thing to remember is that different chocolates have different percentage of theobromine in them. The easiest way to remember is: the darker the chocolate the higher percentage. White chocolate has very little amount, milk chocolate has about 44-64mg of theobromine per ounce of chocolate, dark chocolate is going to be the most toxic to your animals unsweet Baker’s chocolate has about 450mg per ounce. That’s a big difference from milk chocolate. To give a better visual; an 80lbs Lab would have to consume 3lbs of milk chocolate for it to potentially be lethal to the animal that same Lab would only have to consume 3.5 ounces of Baker’s chocolate to have the same toxic effect as the milk chocolate. Again, every situation and every animal is unique which is why it is important to recognize some important signs that your cat or dogs possibly consumed chocolate. Although many cats often do not bother with chocolate there are a few who might get curious, symptoms for felines are vomiting, diarrhea, rapid breathing, increase heart rate, or seizures. For canines: vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, increase heart rate and body temperature. If your pet is in any way acting sick or lethargic and you believe they may have gotten into chocolate take them to your vet immediately as the most important thing is to get the toxins out of their system as quick as possible.

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Another food hazard that people are not always aware of are sugar-free treats. The sugar substitute in these candies is called xylitol.  It is very toxic to animals and can cause hypoglycemia which can be fatal causing things such as liver failure. Some of these candies you will see around Easter include gum, jelly beans, gummies, licorice, and lollipops. Consumption of sugar-free candies can cause a lot of the same symptoms as chocolate some more severe signs associated with candy consumption are your pet becoming disoriented or collapsing. If this occurs please get your pet to the nearest emergency clinic.

Foods are not the only things that your curious four-legged friends can get into. We all love a good Easter egg hunt and this year someone might find it clever and funny to fill those bright colored eggs with something not so appealing to your kids! Like maybe dog kibble? Grass? Or something else? Some of you may be better masterminds at ways to slightly pick on your kids, it’s all in good fun of course and it never gets old to see those pouty looks on children’s faces but just remember your pupper has a better sniffer than your kid and will more than likely find those delicious eggs before they do and eat the plastic eggs areuse-plastic-easter-eggs33long with the contents inside. The sharp torn pieces of plastic could do serious damage to your dog’s intestines and other vital organs. The eggs could also become a choking hazard, as we know a lot of the time dogs try to swallow things before completely chewing them. These potential hazards don’t mean that you have to keep your dog shut off from all the festivities, they are enjoying the holiday as much as their human counterparts but keeping an eye on their whereabouts, know where the eggs are, or just having your pet on a leash can go along way in having a great holiday.

We have talked a lot about dogs and the hazards surrounding them but cats are not exempt from getting into something on Easter. Although they may not be interested in chocolate or candy (but remember it is toxic to them too!) they have their own fascinations surrounding the holiday. The Easter basket seems to be the most “caution zone” area for your pets, your kitties may not be interested in the sweet stuff but they are very interested in the stuff under all those goodies: yes, your cat will go for the Easter grass in the basket. Most Easter grass is made of small strings of plastic and just like the plastic eggs for your dog are no good the grass for cats is very dangerous.

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First off the grass comes in a variety of bright colors and cats love bright colors, they will be attracted to it from across the room and to them it just looks like a huge bowl of pretty and delicious spaghetti and because they are kittens and rulers of the household natural this meal was especially prepared for them. The dangers of your cat consuming the Easter grass however is no joke, cats have very small organs and eating something so compact and stringy results in abdominal and intestinal blockage. Removal of Easter grass from a cat’s organs can only be donethrough surgery by a veterinarian. A very important thing to remember if you see a string hanging out of your cats mouth (or backside as well) NEVER pull on the string, this will result in intestinal damage; the best way to think of this is your cats intestines are like a drawstring effect when you try to pull on the string, this is why surgery is the only safe way to remove the string/ grass from your pet. Keeping an eye on your feline around the Easter baskets is essential but there are signs if they find a way to sneak into that appealing treat: abdominal swelling or sensitivity, lack of energy, loss of appetite, and trouble urinating or defecating are all signs that your cat has some type of blockage and should be taken to your local vet.

T263-2BOne last thing to be aware of when it comes to your cats is plants. We all know cats love to nibble on plants and as spring time comes around we start to bring more and more flowers into our homes.  Once again, our regal fur-babies will be happy that the human brought them lovely treats to enjoy but one plant we should be aware of this holiday is Easter lilies.  Many of us bring these into our home in spirit of Easter without realizing they are very toxic to cats.  Anything from nibbling on the plant, to drinking the plant water, even if the pollen gets on your kitty’s paws and they lick it.  However your cat interacts with the plant it can be very dangerous possibly resulting in kidney failure causing symptoms such as vomiting, change in appetite, and increase or decrease in urination.  If you have Easter lilies in your house just make sure you keep an eye on your little acrobats and don’t let them jump up on the counter that’s displaying your beautiful lilies.

Hazards are a part of everyday life when you have pets, it just comes with the territory of owning an animal and during holidays often hazards becoming a little bit bigger problem but this doesn’t mean that we spend the whole time worrying and not enjoying the holiday. Your pets are family and they want to share in the memories of being together with you, so include your pets in the activities and enjoy being together as a family.  Knowledge and awareness are the best defense for your furry family members and hopefully after reading this you are more knowledgeable and aware so every member of your family two-legged and four-legged can be together and enjoy Easter.  Remember: they love being with you and depend on you to be their protectors.

Have an Amazing and Safe Easter!

By: Deanna Smith

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Let’s Talk Turkey!

Thanksgiving is a time for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also a time for possible distress for our animal companions. The days following Thanksgiving are always busy at the Clinic and our cages are always full of pets that overdid it! Pets (and their owners!) won’t be so thankful when they get an upset tummy and have to visit the vet!

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Check out the following tips for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too:

Keep the feast on the table—not under it: Eating turkey or turkey skin – sometimes even a small amount – can cause a life-threatening condition in pets known as pancreatitis. Fatty foods are hard for animals to digest, and many foods that are healthy for people are poisonous to pets – including onions, raisins and grapes. Do not give your pet the left over carcass–the bones are brittle and can be problematic for the digestive tract.

No Bread Dough: Don’t spoil your pet’s holiday by giving him access to raw yeast bread dough. When a dog or cat ingests raw bread dough, the yeast continues to convert the sugars in the dough to carbon dioxide gas and alcohol. This can result in bloated drunken pets, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring hospitalization.

Don’t Let Them Eat Cake: If you plan to bake Thanksgiving desserts, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning. Many ingredients such as chocolate and raisins are toxic to pets.

A Feast Fit for a King: If you want to share a Thanksgiving treat with your pet, make or buy a treat that is made just for them. Offer them made-for-pets chew bones or a special can of food. Or stuff their usual dinner—perhaps with a few added tidbits of pet friendly foods such as vegetables (try sweet potato or green beans)—inside a food puzzle toy. They’ll be happily occupied for awhile, working hard to extract their dinner from the toy.

Some other Holiday Tips:

Put the trash away!   A turkey carcass sitting out on the carving table, or left in a trash container that is open or easily opened, could be deadly to your family pet. Dispose of turkey carcasses and bones – and anything used to wrap or tie the meat, such as strings, bags and packaging – in a covered, tightly secured trash bag placed in a closed trash.

Be careful with decorative plants. Don’t forget that some flowers and festive plants can be toxic to pets. These include amaryllis, Baby’s Breath, Sweet William, some ferns, hydrangeas and more. The ASPCA offers lists of plants that are toxic to both dogs and cats (http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control) but the safest route is simply to keep your pets away from all plants and table decorations.

Visitors can upset your pets. Some pets are shy or excitable around new people or in crowds, and Thanksgiving often means many visitors at once and higher-than-usual noise and activity levels. If you know your dog or cat is nervous when people visit your home, put him/her in another room or a crate with a favorite toy. This will reduce the emotional stress on your pet and protect your guests from possible injury. If your pet is particularly upset by houseguests, talk to your veterinarian about possible solutions to this common problem.

And remember-  If you have an emergency with your pet on Thanksgiving, please contact one of the Animal Emergency Clinics:  Calder Rd: 281-332-1678 or Edgebrook: 713-941-8460.

 

Holiday Hazards

The holidays are a joyous occasion, and often people include pets in festivities. Unfortunately, the holidays can often create hazardous situations for pets and the number pet poison cases increases this time of year. To keep your pet safe, Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) Toxicology Section Head Tam Garland, DVM, PhD, suggests keeping an eye on the following:Santa Dog

 Lethal food combinations: Maintaining a pet on their normal food is always a good idea. Some foods, such as chocolate, may be poisonous to the pet. Feeding scraps may encourage inappropriate behavior such as begging. Changes in diet, such as table scraps can cause diarrhea or vomiting and thus make a holiday celebration less pleasant for all concerned.

Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, both of which can be toxic to pets; vomiting, diarrhea, heart problems and death can occur if ingested. If your pet should get into chocolates, please call your veterinarian or a veterinary emergency hospital as soon as possible. Be prepared to tell them what your pet weighs, and how much of what type of chocolate the pet ingested.

Baking chocolates and dark chocolates are more dangerous than white chocolate. Some pets can ingest a small amount of chocolate and be fine, other pets may develop vomiting, diarrhea, nervousness, hyperactivity, bloat and possibly death. Chocolates of any kind should not be given to pets. This includes things like chocolate chip cookies, chocolate covered peppermint patties, and other holiday foods and treats.

Caffeine is found in many soft drinks and special holiday drinks, such as sweetened chocolate or coffee. These should not be given to pets.

Fruit Cakes may contain rum or other alcohol. Alcohol poisoning is very dangerous to pets, causing a drop in body temperature, blood sugar and blood pressure. Rising bread dough can cause obstruction if ingested. The yeast can also result in alcohol poisoning in pets. Please keep bread dough, fruit cakes, rum raisin cookies and holiday treats of this sort well out of reach of pets. Reminding guests to refrain from sharing human food with your pets is always acceptable.

Food products used in ornaments: Homemade ornaments, especially those made of play dough-type material or other salt-based products or food, can be extremely toxic to pets. The salt or play dough ornaments appeal to pets as a tasty treat because of the salt. However, an ingestion of a salt-based ornament can cause an animal’s death. Animals ingesting these types of ornaments need to be treated by a veterinarian for salt poisoning.

Pets do not often take a bite out of glass ornaments but it has been known to occur. Pets can step on and break glass ornaments as well. Cuts to the mouth or pads of the foot may be painful and need a veterinarian’s attention to remove the glass and close the wound depending upon the severity of the cut.

Holiday Hazards: Candles should not be placed where a pet could knock them over. Remember, cats often jump up and knock items off of a shelf or mantle, especially if it is in a location they are accustomed to occupying. A dancing flame can be interesting to felines who have been known to swipe at the flame. Burns may occur but fires may be a bigger danger in the home.

Plants: Poinsettia plants and Christmas cactus are often considered the must-havekitten Christmas plants of the season and can cause adverse reactions in pets. Animals that ingest these plants may experience gastric distress, such as vomiting and diarrhea. Generally this is self-limiting. The pet will often overcome this irritation within 24-48 hours. Provide small amounts of water but offer no food until the vomiting has stopped; this may help settle the stomach. It is always wise to consult your veterinarian anytime your pet has an upset stomach.

Tinsel decorating a Christmas tree or wreath is shiny, lightweight and moves very easily, enticing playful cats. Ingested tinsel can lodge or anchor in the stomach, inhibiting passage through the intestines. It can also wrap around the base of the tongue and cause serious injury and impede the ability to eat or drink. Tinsel can actually cut tissue as the intestines contract. Yarn can behave in a similar fashion. Both tinsel and yarn represent special hazards to felines.

Holiday Perfumes: Holidays are often filled with guests and the desire to perfume the home. Liquid potpourris may be the choice for the perfume but can contain essential oils and cationic detergents which if consumed can cause chemical burns to the mouth, difficulty breathing, tremors and fever. Dogs may be affected but are not quite as sensitive to these chemicals as cats. Potpourris, whether liquid or dry, should be kept well out of the reach of pets.

Watch for any signs of distress or changes in your pet’s behavior during this holiday season. An owner’s awareness of possibly harmful decorations and foods is the most effective way to reduce pet toxicity over the holiday. Following these simple guidelines will help make the holidays fun and safe for you and your pet(s)!

 

Stress Reduction Through Synthetic Pheromone Therapy

By Erin Fitzpatrick-Wacker

All pets can experience some form of stress throughout their lives. Luckily for cats and dogs, there are some veterinary alternatives available to help ease their stress.

For cats, there are 3 options available: Feliway Diffuser (covers 750 sq. ft. for continuous coverage for one month), Feliway Spray (spray areas for direct coverage 10 minutes before needed), and Meridian Collar (high pheromone concentration that travels with patient and lasts 30 days).

Is your cat scared of unfamiliar situations or sounds, worried during travel, scared or nervous while riding in the car, anxious during grooming or boarding, scared of new furniture or a new home environment, afraid of a new pet in the household or maintaining multi-cat households, damaging or scratching furniture or walls, afraid of meeting new people or new babies, scared during veterinary visits or hospitalization visits, or inappropriately marking areas with urine? If your cat falls into any of these categories, Feliway or Meridian might be a good choice to help adapt to these challenging situations.

Feliway is a synthetic pheromone that mimics the facial pheromone produced when a cat rubs its face on an object to scent mark. Meridian is a synthetic pheromone that mimics the pheromones mother cats produce to reassure kittens. The calming pheromones reduce the alarming sense cats can feel during stressful situations and help control those unwanted behaviors that stem from stress. Your cat doesn’t have to be showing symptoms of stress to enjoy the benefits of stress reduction that these products can offer.

Feliway studies show that it reduces house soiling by 57%. Be sure to contact your veterinarian about improper urine marking, since this could be a sign of something besides stress.

For dogs, there are 3 options avaiable: Adaptil Diffuser (covers 750 sq. ft. for continuous coverage for one month), Adaptil Spray (spray areas for direct coverage 10 minutes before needed), and Adaptil Collar (high pheromone concentration that travels with patient and lasts 30 days).

Is your dog one to hide from loud noises (fireworks), afraid of meeting new people or going to a new place, destructive when left alone, scared or nervous while riding in the car, afraid or noisy during the night, anxious during veterinary visits, unsettled during puppy training classes, anxious during grooming or boarding, scared of a new leash or the crate, or stressed during any new situation? If you dog falls into any of these categories, Adaptil might be a good choice to help adapt to these challenging situations.

Stress can be the main cause of destructive behaviors, fearful behaviors (barking, cowering, biting), or even house soiling. Studies show that it is essential to minimize stress in the first year of puppy growth to optimize their growth and socialization potential.
Adaptil studies show that it reduces excessive barking by 70%, reduces destructive behavior by 86%, reduces house soiling by 67%, and reduces night time troubles for new puppies for 68%.

Sometimes Adaptil, Feliway, and Meridian alone aren’t enough to help ease the stressful situations that life places in our path. If that is the case, contact your veterinarian for alternative and additional choices.